Archive for March, 2014

Join the Rock Creek Sports Club team at the Merrell Down & Dirty Race!

Written by Sharon Sellers. Posted in Blog, RCSC News

Join Hector and the rest of the Rock Creek Sports Club team at this year’s Merrell Down & Dirty Race, July 13, 2014 at Prince George’s Stadium in Bowie, MD. This obstacle-climbing, trail-blazing race comes in two sizes – 3 miles and 6 miles, plus a kid’s race for ages 4-13.  Sponsored by Subaru, this event series raises money for Operation Gratitude, a Los Angeles based charity that sends care packages to deployed U.S. military. Register before April 6th to get the best pricing and be sure to select “racing with a team” and then select “Rock Creek Sports Club”. See Hector for details of race day.  And join Hector every Wednesday at 7pm for his 5k race through Rock Creek park.  This training run is open to members and non-members and will help you improve your race time. Check out this video of last years Down and Dirty race – you want to be there! Washington DC Merrell Down & Dirty Obstacle Race

Join Hector’s Run Club!

Written by RCSC Writer. Posted in RCSC News

 Run ClubIt’s back!  Starting April 2, Hector will once again lead a 5K every Wednesday at 7 pm through Rock Creek Park. Members and non-members are welcome!  Runners will be timed, to help you gauge where you are at with your training (or just for fun!) and afterward we’ll provide water and snacks to refuel.

Also be sure to visit Hector’s running board, located in the the hallway to the basement, for the latest news on local races.

How Alcohol Effects Muscles Building

Written by RCSC Writer. Posted in Blog, Wellness Bites

Women OutdoorYou probably don’t need a scientific study to tell you that if you’re trying to stay healthy, build muscle, etc., you probably shouldn’t drink copious amounts of alcohol.  But does alcohol effect the recovery process? That’s what one group of Australian scientists decided to find out.

Runner’s World explains the experiment as such:

“The basic idea of the study was straightforward. Put volunteers through a rigorous exercise routine (it was a mix of weights, sustained cycling, and high-intensity sprints, designed to simulate the demands of a team-sport match); have them do it three times. After two of the trials, give them the “optimal” post-exercise nutrition: 25 grams of protein immediately after, a carbohydrate-rich meal two hours later, and another 25 grams of protein four hours later. During this recovery period, have them drink a bunch of drinks, either containing placebo or a total of 1.5 grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight. In a third trial, give them alcohol but replace the protein with calorie-equivalent carbohydrate.”

The Findings:  Not really surprising —  the scientists found that even when the men ate well,  alcohol can impair the recovery process AND adaptation to training and/or subsequent performance. Just something to keep in mind the next time you’re celebrating on a Saturday while you’re in the middle of training for that 5K or weightlifting competition.

Read the full Runner World’s story Here: How Alcohol Effects Muscle Building

New & Improved Class Schedule!

Written by RCSC Writer. Posted in RCSC News

Class scheduleCheck out the new look of our Group Exercise schedule!

We are in the process of transitioning to a new software program called “MotionVibe” which will ultimately give you, our beloved members, more ways to interact with your favorite instructors, receive news about your favorite classes, and more easily reserve a spot in class (plus lots more).

We are still in the learning stages of the program, but check out what the new schedule format looks like and what information it provides at a click of your mouse!

Simple Exercises to Boost Your Balance

Written by RCSC Writer. Posted in Blog, Wellness Bites

cardio and toneWhile many of us probably don’t start thinking about possible problems with our balance until much later on in life,  experts say its a good idea to start working toward improving it as early as your 30s and 40s.

“People don’t usually think about balance until they fall, but little signs such as relying on handrails to go up and down stairs can be early warnings that stability is starting to go,” Jason Jackson, a physical therapist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, explained to the Wall Street Journal.

The article went on to say that experts suggest doing exercises in a couple of 5- to 10-minute bouts each day.  Here’s a few of the examples they included:

  • For people in cities with public transportation, avoid clutching tightly on to the poles in subway cars. A lighter grip will challenge your body to maintain stability on its own.
  • At home, create an unstable surface by using either a Bosu ball or a couple of thick pillows. Stand on top of the ball or pillows and balance on one leg while swinging the other leg back and forth. Then switch legs and repeat. (If standing on a Bosu ball or pillows feels too challenging, try sitting on the ball with your legs straight in front of you and shift your weight from side to side.)

  • For office workers, simply getting up from a chair 10 times in a row can be useful, says Mr. Jackson. Alternate between getting up with your feet in wide stance, which provides more support, and getting up with a narrow stance with your feet touching.

For more tips, check out the full article: Boost Your Balance; Avoid Falls | Wall Street Journal